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HAZARD ANALYSIS CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP)

 

QMRS assess the prerequisites programs (GMPs) that are essential for HACCP success and design/develop the format of HACCP plans

 

QMRS issue a “Certificate of GMPs Compliance”, if the facility found to be fulfilling the HACCP pre-requisites requirements

 

QMRS courses are accredited by the "International HACCP Alliance“ organization

 

Candidate, who completes the training program, receives a Certificate of Completion” from QMRS displaying the Alliance Seal, which indicate the International HACCP Alliance Accreditation

 

WHAT IS HACCP PLAN?

  1. HISTORY & BACKGROUND

HACCP is a management system in which food safety is addressed through the analysis and control of biological, chemical, and physical hazards from raw material production, procurement and handling, to manufacturing, distribution and consumption of the finished product. For successful implementation of a HACCP plan, management must be strongly committed to the HACCP concept.  

HACCP is designed for use in all segments of the food industry. Prerequisite programs such as Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) are an essential foundation for the development and implementation of successful HACCP plans. Food safety systems based on the HACCP principles have been successfully applied in food processing plants, retail food stores, and food service operations.

 

The HACCP concept was initiated in the 1960's by an American company (the Pillsbury Company), the US Army, and NASA as a collaborative development of the production of safe foods for the space program. NASA wanted a "zero defects" program to guarantee safety in the foods that astronauts would be consuming in space. “Pillsbury” therefore, introduced and adopted HACCP as a system that could provide the greatest safety while reducing dependence on finished product sampling and testing. The National Academy of Science (USA) recommended in 1985 that the HACCP approach be adopted in food processing establishments to ensure food safety. Since then, HACCP has been recognized internationally as a logical tool towards a more modern, scientifically based inspection system.

The Codex Alimentarius (FAO/WHO) Food Hygiene Committee mandated a working group in 1991 that has developed guidelines for HACCP application. This document has been well received and is getting wide international acceptance. The concepts incorporated in the Canadian model; the Canadian Food Inspection Agency requirements are consistent with the Codex approach towards HACCP.

  1. CANADIAN FOOD INSPECTION AGENCY (CFIA)

Canada has a very effective food inspection system. The Food Safety Enhancement Program (FSEP) is the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) approach to encourage and support the development, implementation and maintenance of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) systems in all federally registered establishments of the meat, dairy, honey, maple syrup, processed fruit and vegetable, shell egg, processed egg and poultry hatchery sectors. The core of FSEP is the internationally recognized HACCP system.

The seven principles of HACCP have been universally accepted by government agencies, trade associations and the food industry around the world.

 

The following is a brief description of the requirements to develop and implement an effective HACCP plans, and how QMRS can assist you to achieve HACCP certification for your employees and facility.

  1. HACCP PREREQUISITE PROGRAMS

Prerequisite programs are defined as universal steps or procedures that control the operational conditions within a food establishment allowing for environmental conditions that are favourable to the production of safe food.

Prerequisite programs are the foundation of the HACCP plans and must be adequate and effective. If any portion of a prerequisite programs is not adequately controlled, then additional critical control points may have to be identified, monitored and maintained under the HACCP plans. All prerequisite programs should be documented and regularly audited, and are established and maintained separately from the HACCP plan.

In summary, effective prerequisite programs will ensure that the integrity of HACCP plans is maintained and that the manufactured product is safe.

Plant management should establish and implement the following prerequisite programs:

  1. Premises: Out side property, building, sanitary facilities, and water

  2. Transportation and Storage: Food carriers, temperature control storage of incoming materials, non-food chemicals and finished products.

  3. Equipments: General equipments design, installation, maintenance, and calibration

  4. Personnel Training: Hygiene and health requirements

  5. Sanitation and Pest Control: Establish and follow written sanitation and pest control programs.

  6. Recalls:  Recall procedures and distribution records

  1. HACCP TASKS

The format of HACCP plans will vary. It is essential that the unique conditions within each facility be considered during the development of all components of the HACCP plan. In many cases the plans will be product and process specific. However, some plans may use a unit operations approach

In the development of a HACCP plan, five preliminary tasks need to be accomplished before the application of the HACCP principles to a specific product and process.

  1. Assemble the HACCP Team. The first task in developing a HACCP plan is to assemble a HACCP team. The HACCP team consisting of individuals who have specific knowledge and expertise appropriate to the product and process. It is the team's responsibility to develop the HACCP plan.

  2. Describe the food and its distributionThis consists of a general description of the food, ingredients, and processing methods. The method of distribution should be described along with information on whether the food is to be distributed frozen, refrigerated, or at ambient temperature.

  3. Describe the intended use and consumers of the food. Describe the normal expected use of the food. The intended consumers may be the general public or a particular segment of the population.

  4. Develop a flow diagram. The purpose of a flow diagram is to provide a clear, simple outline of the steps involved in the process. The scope of the flow diagram must cover all the steps in the process, which are directly under the control of the establishment. In addition, the flow diagram can include steps in the food chain that occurs in the establishment

  5. Verify the flow diagram. The HACCP team should perform an on-site review of the operation to verify the accuracy and completeness of the flow diagram. Modifications should be made to the flow diagram as necessary and documented.

After these five preliminary tasks have been completed, the seven principles of HACCP are applied.

  1. HACCP PRINCIPLES:

HACCP is based on the following seven principles:
Principle 1:
Identify the potential hazards associated with food production at all stages, from growth, processing, manufacturing, and distribution to the point of consumption. Assess the likelihood of occurrence of the hazards and identify preventive measures for their control (risk management).
Principle 2:
Determine the points, procedures, and operational steps that can be controlled to eliminate the hazards or minimize their likelihood of occurrence; these are the critical control points (CCPs).
Principle 3:
Establish critical limits, which must be met to ensure that the CCPs are under control.
Principle 4:
Establish a system to monitor control of CCPs by scheduled testing or observations.
Principle 5:
Establish the corrective action to be taken, when monitoring indicates that a particular CCP is not under control.
Principle 6:
Establish procedures for verification, which include supplementary tests and procedures to confirm that the HACCP system is working effectively.
Principle 7:
Establish documentation concerning all procedures and records appropriate to these principles and their application.

APPLICATION OF HACCP (Sequence for implementation)

The following sequence of 12 steps is the recommended approach for the development of a HACCP program. This logic sequence has been agreed to at the international level by a HACCP working group of Codex Alimentarius (WHO/FAO). The seven basic principles of HACCP are indicated in the brackets

1.   Assemble the HACCP team

2.   Describe product

3.   Identify intended use

4.   Construct process flow diagram and plant schematic

5.   On-site verification of flow diagram and plant schematic

6.   List hazards associated with each step (Principle 1)

7.   Apply HACCP decision tree to determine the CCP (Principle 2)

8.   Establish critical limits (Principle 3)

9.   Establish monitoring procedures (Principle 4)

10. Establish deviation procedures (Principle 5)

11. Establish verification procedures (Principle 6)

12. Establish record keeping / documentation for principles one through six (Principle 7)

In brief, the key element of a HACCP based system is its preventative nature and the exercising of control throughout the manufacturing process, at critical steps called Critical Control Points (CCP). By doing so, defects, which could impact on the safety of the food being processed can be readily detected and corrected at these points before the product is completely processed and packaged.

 

Most companies will find that many of the HACCP system requirements are already in place and operable in their plants. However, some facilities still have not established the system. It is, therefore, the objective of QMRS to assist the food industry to design, test, and apply a Food Safety Program, building on HACCP principles.

 

Although discussing the above tasks in any particulars is beyond the scope of this page, we have chosen to describe the first task requirements (Assemble the HACCP team) in some details, in order to provide the facility management with the basic necessities to start the HACCP development process. Below are the details

 

ASSEMBLE THE HACCP TEAM

 

Team composition

When selecting the team, the management should focus on:

1.    Those who will be involved in hazard identification

2.    Those who will be involved in determination of critical control points

3.    Those who will monitor critical control points

4.    Those who will verify operations at critical control points

5.    Those who will examine samples and perform verification procedures

Knowledge required

Selected personnel should have a basic understanding of:

1.    Technology and equipment used on the processing lines

2.    Practical aspects of the food operations

3.    The flow and technology of the process

4.    Applied aspects of food microbiology

5.    HACCP principles and techniques

6.   It is essential that the team members be trained on the Principles of Food Hygiene and the application of the HACCP system

Scope

The HACCP team should identify the scope of the HACCP plan: 

1.    Limit the study to a specific product and process

2.    Define the type(s) of hazards to be included (e.g. biological, chemical, physical)

3.    Define the part of the food chain to be studied

Coordinator

The team must include a coordinator (chairperson) whose role is to:

1.    Ensure that the composition of the team meets the needs of the study

2.    Suggest changes to the team if necessary

3.    Coordinate the team's work

4.    Ensure that the agreed established plan is followed

5.    Share the work and responsibilities

6.    Ensure that a systematic approach is used

7.    Ensure that the scope of the study is met

8.    Chair meetings so that team members can freely express their ideas

9.    Represent the team before management

10.   Provide management with an estimate of the time, money and labour required for the study

 

 

HACCP TRAINING

This is to assure that all individuals involved in the program are properly trained so they understand their role and can effectively fulfill their responsibilities. Specific training activities should include courses, workshops, working instructions and procedures that outline the tasks of the employee who are monitoring each CCP. Therefore, plant management must provide adequate resources for thorough education and training. In fact, effective trainings considered as an important prerequisite to successful implementation of a HACCP plan.

 

QMRS is a leading provider of food safety training. Our instructors are Ph.D. holders. We have an International expertise in the Middle East (Saudi Arabia and other Arab Gulf countries, North Africa, Egypt, and Iran).

 

QMRS provides two accredited training courses:

A. HACCP PREREQUISITE PROGRAM

This course is designed to address all aspects of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) requirements.

B. HACCP PRINCIPLES, DEVELOPMENT, AND IMPLEMENTATION  PROGRAM

This program is designed to provide the trainees with all the information necessary on the seven principles of HACCP, how they relate to prerequisite programs, how to write HACCP plans and its implementation

 

These courses are ideal for operational team who want a thorough understanding of their company's HACCP requirements.

For full description of these courses please click on TRAINING COURSES

In this context, it might be necessary to mention that:

  1. QMRS HACCP courses have been designed to meet the training requirements established by the FAO Codex Alimentarius Commission guideline and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

  2. QMRS HACCP courses have been reviewed and accredited by “The International HACCP Alliance “organization (Please click on the link below). to verify that QMRS name is among the Accredited Introductory HACCP Training Programs Providers and Approved Lead Instructors

  3. The instructor (Dr. Jalal Mokhalalati) has been accredited by “International HACCP Alliance” Organization” as a “Lead Instructor”

  4. Candidate, who successfully will complete the training program, will receive “a certificate of completion” from QMRS displaying the Alliance Seal, which indicate the International HACCP Alliance Accreditation.

HACCP AUDIT & CERTIFICATION

Sometimes manufacturing plants are not fully ready for certification, but would like an expert consultation to prepare for implementing or improving the current organization GMPs-HACCP and/or ISO 9001:2000 programs.

We (QMRS) conduct third party audits (Off-site and On-Site audit) to determine your plant's status/readiness to develop and implement the best but cost-effective GMPs and Quality Management System programs and to ensure that your facility meets the requirements of local and international regulatory agencies.

If we found that your HACCP plan is properly implemented and complies with FAO/WHO Codex and the Canadian CFIA standards, QMRS will provide you with a certificate stating that the HACCP program in your plant has successfully passed the QMRS HACCP audit.

 

IN BRIEF, QMRS CAN ASSIST YOU IN:

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of your prerequisite programs through conducting On-site GMPs audit.

  • Provide you with all the documents (SOPs & templates) needed to fulfill the principles of HACCP.

  • Design, test, and develop the format of HACCP plans

  • Provide accredited HACCP training Programs.

  • We provide you with a certificate stating that your plant has successfully passed the HACCP audit.

  • HACCP courses can be customized to accommodate specific facility needs.

  • Please Let us know the level of the needed support that suits your organization. QMRS can be your HACCP partner.

    For more information about QMRS INTERNATIONAL HACCP programs, please click HERE to send us an e-mail. 

     

    Certification of Your HACCP Advantage System

    Certification Is the status obtained from the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) after a successful HACCP Advantage certification audit.

    Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food (OMAF) has designated and recognized the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) as the certification body for the HACCP Advantage; and OMAF recognizes HACCP Advantage systems certified by CGSB.

     

    STEPS FOR A CERTIFICATION AND RECOGNITION

    1. PREPARING FOR A CERTIFICATION AUDIT

    Before you apply for certification you should ensure that your operations and personnel are ready for auditing. .

    Internal Audit

    It would be sensible to develop a regular schedule of internal audits to ensure that your system continues to operate effectively.

    Personnel Preparation

    All personnel with HACCP responsibilities should be trained and able to answer interview questions regarding their roles and specific duties and where to find information (e.g., manuals, supporting materials) regarding their roles

    Confirmation of Outsourcing Effectiveness

    Ensure that outsourced programs (e.g., pest control or sanitation) are effective, meet the standards and are properly documented.

    Organized Documentation

    The better organized your documentation, the better your HACCP system will be and the smoother your audits will proceed.

     

    1. APPLY TO CGSB FOR CERTIFICATION (For Canadian Facilities only)

    • Prepare the following items in the application package:

    • Letter of Intent indicating management commitment

    • Food Safety Management System (FSMS) policy

    • Identification of HACCP coordinator/team

    • Checklist indicating all prerequisite program standards have been addressed

    • List of products and HACCP plan groupings

    • Checklist of HACCP plan forms 1–8 for each HACCP plan

    • Blank copies of some sample records

    • Written procedures for program maintenance including logbook methodology

    • Internal audit results

    • Application forms provided by CGSB.

    1. CGSB CERTIFICATION PROCESS

    CGSB auditors will conduct audits in three general phases:

    Documentation Review

    The documentation review is conducted to ensure that no major components of your HACCP system are missing.

    On-Site Systems Audit

    The systems audit is essentially a “desk audit” conducted to confirm that you have effectively addressed all the prerequisite program standards and that your HACCP plan(s) are complete and effective.

    On-Site Verification Audit

    The on-site verification ensures that the written prerequisites programs and HACCP plan(s) are performed as written

    Audit Outcomes

    CGSB provides operator with a written audit report that includes CARs for all outstanding non-conformances.

    Operator Follow-up: Operator provides CGSB with CAPs for all identified CARs within specified time frame.

    Verification Audit

    The verification audit allows the auditor(s) to confirm that your written HACCP system has been effectively implemented as written.

    IN SUMMARY

    In order for your facility to be HACCP certified, the following conditions must be met:

    • CGSB auditors recommend your facility for certification assuming all non-conformances are addressed

    • Corrective actions for all non-conformances are submitted to CGSB for review within required timeframe.

    • CGSB auditors find all corrective actions acceptable.

    • CGSB will notify the concerned governmental body (OMAF) of certified (and decertified) facilities.

    • Following successful auditing and corrective actions, you will receive a HACCP Advantage certificate.

    To learn more about this accreditation body please click

     

    WHAT’S NEW

     

    THE FOOD SAFETY AND TRACEABILITY INITIATIVE (FSTI)

    The FSTI provides cost-share funding to individual facilities to support the implementation of written food safety programs and working traceability systems through the purchase and installation of equipment, the certification of Recognized Food Safety Programs and/or the training of employees.

    Projects eligible for cost sharing include:

    Project Option 1: Implementing a Food Safety Program or a Traceability System

    Up to $20,000 per applicant, with 75 percent of an applicant’s eligible costs reimbursed by the government, to develop, write and implement a food safety program, individual food safety practices, or a working traceability system.

    Project Option 2: Supporting Investment in an Existing Food Safety Program

    Up to $20,000 per applicant, with 75 percent of an applicant’s eligible costs will be reimbursed by the government. Only applicants currently certified, or audited under a Recognized Food Safety Program and whose project involves further food safety improvements to their existing food safety program may apply under this option.

    Project Option 3: Improving Food Safety or Traceability

    Up to $5,000 per applicant, with 75 percent of an applicant’s eligible costs reimbursed by the government, to purchase equipment, engage in training, or obtain certification, audit or verification (first time only) of a Recognized Food Safety Program

    Under the FSTI, an applicant may submit separate applications to carry out more than one project. However, there is a maximum total funding limit of $20,000 per applicant under the FSTI.

    CONTACT INFORMATION

    Additional information and advice on how to develop a food safety program, a traceability system or how to complete an application form is available from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (http://www.ontario.ca/foodsafety).

    Or feel free to call Dr Jalal at 613 526 0471 to discuss your requirements

     

    DID YOU KNOW THAT …

    The principal (Dr. Jalal Mokhalalati) has contributed  in the “4th Dubai International Food Safety Conference” (24 – 26 February 2009) by presenting a work where he proposed a new and easy approach to develop a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan  

    Please see below the abstract. The original article is under publication.

    TOWARDS A SIMPLE APPROACH TO DEVELOP A HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP) PLAN

    Jalal Mokhalalati, B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. (London)

    4th Dubai International Food Safety Conference (24 – 26 February 2009)

    ABSTRACT

    It has been reported that difficulties often encountered in applying the Codex HACCP system in small food businesses and that one of the criticisms of HACCP plan development is its requirement for documentation. In view of these observations, the author is proposing a simple approach to develop a HACCP plan to secure an adequate food safety system.

    Although the approach is still faithful to the seven HACCP principles, it does not however require the HACCP team to follow the traditional 10 Forms and decision tree as outlined in the current guidelines. The author methodology is based on evaluation of the FAO HACCP Forms functions and format.

    In this work it is suggested that the HACCP team objective should be to focus only on the hazards (biological, chemical, and physical), which are under the manufacturing facility control (Internal Hazards) and to exclude those hazards, which are out of the facility control (External Hazards).

    The proposed work objective is to make the HACCP implementation simpler and easier. It is hoped that the approach will assist regulatory agents’ officials to reduce the number of barriers, which prevent small food facilities of implementing the HACCP program through minimize the documentations requirements.